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Keynote Lectures

A Data-as-a-Service Framework for IoT Big Data
Laurence T. Yang, St Francis Xavier University, Canada

IP-Oriented QoS and QoE in the Next Generation Networks - Application to Wireless Networks
Pascal Lorenz, University of Haute Alsace, France

The Smart Grid and the Internet should be Friends
Donal O'Mahony, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

Instantaneous Frequency Analysis
David Naccache, Ecole Normale Superieure, France

 

A Data-as-a-Service Framework for IoT Big Data

Laurence T. Yang
St Francis Xavier University
Canada
 

Brief Bio

Dr. Laurence T. Yang is  a professor at School of Computer Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China and Department of Computer Science of St. Francis Xavier University, Canada . His current research includes parallel and distributed computing, embedded and ubiquitous/pervasive computing.

He has published many papers in various refereed journals, conference proceedings and book chapters in the above areas including around 140 international journal papers such as IEEE and ACM Transactions.  He has been involved actively in conferences and workshops as a program/general/steering conference chair and numerous conference and workshops as a program committee member. He served as the vice-chair of IEEE Technical Committee of Supercomputing Applications (2001-2004), the chair of IEEE Technical Committee of Scalable Computing (2008-2011), and the chair of IEEE Task force on Ubiquitous Computing and Intelligence (2009-now). He was in the steering committee of IEEE/ACM Supercomputing (SC-XY) conference series (2008-2011), and currently is in the National Resource Allocation Committee (NRAC) of Compute Canada (2009-now).

In addition, he is the editors-in-chief of several international journals. He is serving as an editor for many international journals. He has been acting as an author/co-author or an editor/co-editor of more than 25 books from well-known publishers. The book “Mobile Intelligence” from Wiley 2010 received an Honorable Mention by the American Publishers Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (The PROSE Awards). He has won several Best Paper Awards (including IEEE Best and Outstanding Conference Awards such as the IEEE 20th International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications (IEEE AINA-06), etc); one Best Paper Nomination; Distinguished Achievement Award, 2005, 2011; Canada Foundation for Innovation Award, 2003. He has been invited to give around 20 keynote talks at various international conferences and symposia.


Abstract

Internet of Things (IoT) has been widely used in our daily life. In the IoT, these smart sensing devices generate a huge amount of sensing data.
The sharp increase of the diverse sensing devices has led to the various heterogeneous data types and the booming growth of the data.
Practically, the valuable information, as a service for users, is mined through analyzing and processing the big data. However, a lot of challenges arise along.
This talk will present our latest research  about a Data-as-a-Service framework which includes data representation, dimensionality reduction and proactive service layers aiming at representing and processing the big data generated from IoT and providing more valued smart services.
Corresponding case studies in some applications such as smart home will be shown to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the proposed framework.



 

 

IP-Oriented QoS and QoE in the Next Generation Networks - Application to Wireless Networks

Pascal Lorenz
University of Haute Alsace
France
 

Brief Bio

Pascal Lorenz (lorenz@ieee.org) received his M.Sc. (1990) and Ph.D. (1994) from the University of Nancy, France. Between 1990 and 1995 he was a research engineer at WorldFIP Europe and at Alcatel-Alsthom. He is a professor at the University of Haute-Alsace, France, since 1995. His research interests include QoS, wireless networks and high-speed networks .He is the author/co-author of 3 books, 3 patents and 200 international publications in refereed journals and conferences.

He was Technical Editor of the IEEE Communications Magazine Editorial Board (2000-2006), Chair of Vertical Issues in Communication Systems Technical Committee Cluster (2008-2009), Chair of the Communications Systems Integration and Modeling Technical Committee (2003-2009) and Chair of the Communications Software Technical Committee (2008-2010). He has served as Co-Program Chair of IEEE WCNC'2012 and ICC'2004, tutorial chair of VTC'2013 Spring and WCNC'2010, track chair of PIMRC'2012, symposium Co-Chair at Globecom 2011-2007 and ICC 2010-2008. He has served as Co-Guest Editor for special issues of IEEE Communications Magazine, Networks Magazine, Wireless Communications Magazine, Telecommunications Systems and LNCS.

He is senior member of the IEEE, IARIA fellow and member of many international program committees. He has organized many conferences, chaired several technical sessions and gave tutorials at major international conferences.


Abstract

Emerging Internet Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms are expected to enable wide spread use of real time services such as VoIP and videoconferencing. The "best effort" Internet delivery cannot be used for the new multimedia applications. New technologies and new standards are necessary to offer Quality of Service (QoS) for these multimedia applications. Therefore new communication architectures integrate mechanisms allowing guaranteed QoS services as well as high rate communications.

The service level agreement with a mobile Internet user is hard to satisfy, since there may not be enough resources available in some parts of the network the mobile user is moving into. The emerging Internet QoS architectures, differentiated services and integrated services, do not consider user mobility. QoS mechanisms enforce a differentiated sharing of bandwidth among services and users. Thus, there must be mechanisms available to identify traffic flows with different QoS parameters, and to make it possible to charge the users based on requested quality. The integration of fixed and mobile wireless access into IP networks presents a cost effective and efficient way to provide seamless end-to-end connectivity and ubiquitous access in a market where the demand for mobile Internet services has grown rapidly and predicted to generate billions of dollars in revenue.



 

 

The Smart Grid and the Internet should be Friends

Donal O'Mahony
Trinity College Dublin
Ireland
 

Brief Bio

Donal O'Mahony is professor of Computer Science at Trinity College Dublin. His research to date has focussed on the challenges of delivering a future Internet that can provide services to a highly connected society with reliability and security. Over the years, this had led to explorations into cryptography, network protocols, security applications, mobility, ad-hoc networking and the software engineering of networked systems.

In 2004 he founded the CTVR telecommunications research centre which in turn acted as the catalyst for the establishment of Bell Labs Ireland. Under his stewardship, this centre raised some €25 million of research funding and published of over 400 high-quality papers in international journals and conferences.

O’Mahony now leads the Networks & Telecommunications Research Group (NTRG) at Trinity College where he has authored two books and over 100 papers.  He is a fellow of Trinity College Dublin (2000) and a Fulbright Fellow (1999).


Abstract

Over the years, computer networks have evolved from highly centralized, single purpose, inflexible entities into the complex web that is today’s Internet.  Over that period, we have seen the introduction of new link technologies, new modes of network organization, many generations of network ownership and governance models even as far as the introduction of completely ad-hoc or opportunistic networks.  This talk will reflect on what lessons can be learnt from this evolution and how we can apply those lessons to pave a path to a modern power grid.  This grid would be better able to cope with an environment where energy is scarce, and intermittently available and supply-demand decisions are the subject of intelligent dialogues between the controlling entities.



 

 

Instantaneous Frequency Analysis

David Naccache
Ecole Normale Superieure
France
 

Brief Bio
David Naccache is a member of the ENS's cryptography group and a professor at the University of Paris II. Before joining academia David managed Gemplus' Applied Research & Security Centre (over 100 researchers). He holds 80 patent families, published more than 80 scientific papers and served in more than 60 programme committees, all in cryptography and security. He is a Forensic Scientist by the Court of Appeal Paris. His interests are embedded electronics, cryptography and security.


Abstract
This paper investigated the use of instantaneous frequency (IF) instead of power amplitude and power spectrum in side-channel analysis.
By opposition to the constant frequency used in Fourier Transform, instantaneous frequency reflects local phase differences and allows detecting frequency variations. These variations reflect the processed binary data and are hence cryptanalytically useful. IF exploits the fact that after higher power drops more time is required to restore power back to its nominal value. Whilst our experiments reveal IF does not bring specific benefits over usual power attacks when applied to unprotected designs, IF allows to obtain much better results in the presence of amplitude modification
countermeasures.



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