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Keynote Lectures

From RF to Lightwave Wireless Power Transfer: Research challenges and Future trends
George Karagiannidis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Forensic challenges on Multimedia analytics, Big Data and the Internet of Things
Zeno Geradts, Netherlands Forensic Institute, Netherlands

The Past, Present and Future of Business Process Management
Jan Mendling, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria

Scientific Research vs Bug Hunting
Ismael Ripoll, Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain

The CLOUD: Trigger for a Socio-Economic Revolution
Tobias Hoellwarth, EuroCloud Europe, Austria

 

From RF to Lightwave Wireless Power Transfer: Research challenges and Future trends

George Karagiannidis
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Greece
 

Brief Bio
George K. Karagiannidis is currently Professor in the Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept. and Director of Digital Telecommunications Systems and Networks Laboratory. He is also Honorary Professor at South West Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China. His research interests are in the broad area of Digital Communications Systems and Signal processing, with emphasis on Wireless Communications, Optical Wireless Communications, Wireless Power Transfer and Applications, Molecular and Nanoscale Communications, Stochastic Processes in Biology and Wireless Security.He is author or co-author of more than 450 technical papers published in scientific journals and presented at international conferences. He is also co-author of the book “Advanced Optical Wireless Communications Systems”, Cambridge Publications, 2012.He was Editor in IEEE Transactions on Communications, Senior Editor of IEEE Communications Letters, and several times Guest Editor in IEEE Selected Areas in Communications. From 2012 to 2015 he was the Editor-in Chief of IEEE Communications Letters. Dr. Karagiannidis is one of the most highly-cited researchers across all areas of Electrical Engineering, recognized as 2015, 2016 and 2017 Web-of-Science highly-cited researcher.


Abstract
Wireless power transfer (WPT) is regarded as a disruptive technological paradigm to prolong the lifetime of energy-constrained devices, such as the ones used in the Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications. Far-field WPT is based on the transmission/reception of propagating electromagnetic waves, including radio frequency (RF) and light waves.  However, as it will be highlighted in this talk, lightwave WPT is fundamentally different to RF, due to the divergent channels characteristics, transmission/reception equipment, and energy harvesting (EH) model, among others. Lightwave WPT creates many new challenges, including the increase of the EH efficiency, the optimal design of the optical devices, and the support of multiuser scenarios, which call for an interdisciplinary approach. Moreover, simultaneous lightwave information and power transfer (SLIPT) will be presented and compared to the corresponding RF-based technology, while future research directions will also be discussed.



 

 

Forensic challenges on Multimedia analytics, Big Data and the Internet of Things

Zeno Geradts
Netherlands Forensic Institute
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Zeno Geradts is a senior forensic scientist at the Netherlands Forensic Institute of the Ministry of Security and Justice at the Forensic Digital Biometrics Traces departement. He is expert witness in the area of forensic (video) image processing and biometrics (facial comparison and biometrics such as hands, feet and clothes) . Within the team Forensic Big Data Analysis he works in research on deep learning and images and video is also working within the European Project ASGARD on Forensic big data analyis. He is nominated as President Elect at the American Academy of Forensic Science in 2018. He is also chairman of the ENFSI Forensic IT Working group. From September 1st 2014, he is professor on Forensic Data Science by special appointment at the University of Amsterdam for 1 day a week. Prof.dr. Zeno Geradts works since 1991 at the Netherlands Forensic Institute as a forensic scientist. Since 1997 he works at the digital evidence departement. In 2002 he received a PhD from the University of Utrecht based on research on computational comparing of forensic images. At the AAFS (American Academy of Forensic Sciences) he has been chairman of the Engineering Section and since 2008-2010 chairman of the section Digital Evidence and Multimedia, he was elected by the section as member of the Board of Directors of the AAFS from 2010-2013. He is elected as Vice President of the AAFS 2015-2016 and 2015-2016 as Treasurer. He is chairman of the ENFSI Forensic IT working group. He published many papers in forensic journals and contributions to books and is active on casework as expert witness and projects in digital evidence.


Abstract
The speed of change in the digital world is challenging for forensic investigations. New devices are developed very rapidly and the Internet of Things is also emerging.  Getting access to devices is getting more complicated due to stronger encryption. The other issue is that the amount of multimedia data is expanding very rapidly and finding relevant evidence is often a challenge. Several challenges can be handled by developing big data analysis platforms that are flexible in incorporating new methods as well as the use of artificial intelligence as well as deep learning. Since evidence has to be used in court, the validation of the results is important to explain the possibilities and limitations of the forensic analysis.



 

 

The Past, Present and Future of Business Process Management

Jan Mendling
Vienna University of Economics and Business
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Jan Mendling is a Full Professor with the Institute for Information Business at Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien, Austria. His research interests include business process management and information systems. He has published more than 300 research papers and articles, among others in the Journal of the Association of Information Systems, ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology, IEEE Transaction on Software Engineering, Information Systems, European Journal of Information Systems, and Decision Support Systems. He is a board member of the Austrian Society for Process Management, one of the founders of the Berliner BPM-Offensive, and member of the IEEE Task Force on Process Mining. He is a co-author of the textbooks Fundamentals of Business Process Management and Wirtschaftsinformatik.


Abstract
Business process management has its roots in workflow modeling and office automation in the 1970s. Since then, it has been closely intertwined with various trends and developments in the area of information system engineering. This talk reflects upon this co-evolution and comments on emerging trends of both fields including blockchain and robotic process automation.



 

 

Scientific Research vs Bug Hunting

Ismael Ripoll
Universitat Politècnica de València
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Ismael Ripoll received a PhD in computer science from the Universitat Politècnica de València in 1996, where he is currently professor of several cybersecurity subjects in the Department of Computing Engineering. In reverse chronological order: before working on security, he participated in multiple research projects related to hypervisor solutions for ESA spacecrafts ; dynamic memory allocation algorithms; Real-Time Linux; and initially in hard real-time scheduling theory. Currently, he is applying all this background to the security field. His current research interests include memory error defense/attacks techniques (SSP and ASLR) and software diversification. He has found several vulnerabilities (CVEs) in the Linux kernel, the GNU C library as well as other widely used software. Also has participated in multiple international hacking conferences.
Ismael Ripoll is a Cybersecurity researcher at UPV Cybersecurity Group.


Abstract
Scientific and technological research is a human activity that tries to explain how the world works and how we can use and modify it for our benefit. As it has happened in other areas, when a new research discipline emerges, it does not appears from nowhere, but departs from one or more already existing disciplines by taking some parts of them. Cybersecurity is a research area that is still under evolution. It is not clear what are the boundaries. That is, what is and what is not cybersecurity. Depending on the background of the researcher, the core of cybersecurity would be cryptography because it is the way to protect the data, or networking, because that it the main attack vector, or software engineering, because they can prevent root cause of the problem. Also, don't forget social engineering, intelligence, IoTdevelopers, etc. Security is a problem (and a research topic) because vulnerabilities exists. Vulnerabilities exist because they are found. They are found by hackers. But hackers are out of the research circuit. What is the impact of discovering a new physical particle, or a new theorem or a property of a new material or algorithm ? And what is the impact of finding a new vulnerability ? Can vulnerability finding be considered an acceptable research goal? Nowadays, they are not. I'll use a really hard to exploit vulnerability, GRBU28, discovered by my group, to show that hacking (vulnerability finding) is as hard as researching in other fields. And that is shall it deserves to be considered a research field on its own.



 

 

The CLOUD: Trigger for a Socio-Economic Revolution

Tobias Hoellwarth
EuroCloud Europe
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Höllwarth has worked as a corporate consultant specialized in IT projects for over 20 years. In addition to his work at the Vienna University of Economics and Business he also founded the companies Höllwarth Consulting, ICT Advisory Network and Sourcing International. Dr. Tobias Höllwarth was a founding member of EuroCloud Austria where he is today a member of the Board and is the director for the international StarAudit program and president of EuroCloud Europe. He acts as an expert for questions pertaining to certification at the Austrian Standards Institute and is leader of the Austrian delegation that participates in negotiations with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) where cloud computing is concerned.


Abstract
When Michelangelo painted the fresco depicting the creation of Adam in the Sistine Chapel, he illustrated how the divine spark jumped from God to the first human being. God created Adam, and in doing so changed the world. The Cloud is likewise such a spark. It is one of the four SMAC elements, part of the “nexus of forces”—but most importantly, it is the visible tool of the industrial revolution that we are lucky enough to be experiencing right now. This presentation will point out the similarities between the Cloud and previous socio-economic revolutions that changed human existence, and explain the positive as well as the disastrous economic consequences that have become visible already. It will delineate the differences between the Cloud, the Internet of Things, Industry 4.0 and other well-known buzz words. Dr. Tobias Höllwarth, president of EuroCloud Europe, will also focus on the current situation of the European society, which is not yet well prepared for this massive change—as can also be seen in the results of many recent political elections. He will explain in what ways the digital transformation of our world causes political radicalization, raising unemployment and with it the frustration and disorientation of more and more individuals. One of the lessons of this presentation will be several examples of how we can participate actively in this fast-changing game and support cloud service customers as well as providers.



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